Welcome to my birdwatching blog. This blog will contain stories about my bird watching trips, interesting bird news and other tales that may or may not be bird related. I want to make it useful to the avid birder as well as those who may only have a passing interest in bird watching. I enjoy photographing bird life, common and rare through a spotting scope, not that they always sit still long enough for me. Being on the outskirts of North East London, my reports will not only cover my local patch of Redbridge/Waltham Forest, but also dip into deepest Essex, Suffolk, Kent and Norfolk.


Saturday, 9 January 2010

Blue tits in this weather

Sorry, I couldn’t resist that.



With further downfalls of snow expected and below freezing temperatures, there is genuine concern for the welfare of many of our garden birds.

As the RSPB are stating, getting enough food to acquire the right amount of fat supplies to 'burn' for energy is a huge feat for birds this winter in particular. And the food and water we provide can be,in many cases, the difference between life and death.

When temperatures fall below freezing, birds struggle to find the food they need to survive the winter in a strong healthy condition, needed for breeding come the springtime. Natural food is covered in snow and impossible to get to. The ground becomes too hard for birds like thrushes and blackbirds to probe, and natural food like berries, acorns and seeds is buried.

The RSPB is asking people to follow a wild bird winter survival plan that will help wildlife during the harshest weather.

1. Put out feed regularly, especially in severe weather. Set up a bird table and use high-calorie seed mixes. This can also be used to put out kitchen scraps such as animal fats, grated cheese and porridge oats.

2. Put out hanging feeders for black sunflower seeds, sunflower hearts, sunflower-rich mixes or unsalted peanuts.

3. Ensure a supply of fresh water every day. If it is very cold use tepid water but do not use any antifreeze products.

4. Put out fruit, such as apples and pears, for Blackbirds, Song Thrushes and other members of the thrush family.

5. Food bars or fat hung up or rubbed into the bark of trees is a great help for Treecreepers, Goldcrests and many other species.

6. Put up nest boxes to provide roost sites for the smaller birds. They will then be used for breeding later in the year.



Now, speaking of nest boxes, for the past few weeks now, a pair of blue tits have been investigating the Braunie Birdbox. They have already started to adjust the entrance hole to suit them by chipping away at it on a daily basis. I shall keep you up-to-date on their progress.

No comments:

Post a Comment